St Patrick’s Day History

St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated each year on March 17th. This day marks the accepted date of Saint Patrick’s death in 460 AD.

St. Patrick’s Day is an Irish holiday celebrated all around the world to honor the patron saint of Ireland, Who was born in Wales around 390 AD.

At the age of sixteen Saint Patrick was kidnapped from his native land of the Roman British Isles by a band pirates, and sold into slavery in Ireland. Saint Patrick worked as a shepherd and turned to religion for comfort. During his captivity he became a Christian and adopted the name Patrick. After six years of slavery he escaped to the Irish coast and fled home to Britain.

While back in his homeland, Patrick decided to become a priest. Patrick wanted to return to Ireland after dreaming that the voices of the Irish people were calling him to convert them to Christianity.

After studying and preparing for several years, Patrick traveled back to Ireland as a Christian missionary. Although there were already some Christians living in Ireland, Saint Patrick was able to bring upon a massive religious shift to Christianity by converting people of power.

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One traditional icon of the day is the shamrock. One Irish tale tells how Patrick used three-leafed shamrock to explain the Trinity. He used it in his sermons to represent how the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit could all exist as separate elements of the same entity. His followers adopted the custom of wearing a shamrock on his feast day. Eventually this tradition led to the wearing of the green.

Saint Patrick’s Day is a cultural and religious celebration that happens annually on 17 March to mark the death date of the most commonly-recognised patron saint of Ireland, Saint Patrick. It is also a public holiday in the Republic of Ireland, Newfoundland, and Labrador and Montserrat.

The first year St. Patrick’s Day was celebrated in America in 1737 in Boston, Massachusetts. The first official St. Patrick’s Day parade was held in New York City in 1766, and It has become a popular holiday in the United States, people wear green and eat corned beef and cabbage.

Another well-known aspect of Saint Patrick’s Day is the colour green. Around the world, many people wear green clothes as a way of marking the day. In major cities, green lights illuminate famous global landmarks such as the Colosseum in Rome or the Christ The Redeemer statue in Rio de Janeiro. In Chicago, thousands of people watch as special boats dye the river a bright green colour.

reference sources: primarygames.com; Hellokids.com; history.com;

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